Today's Evil Beet Gossip

Quotables: Why Kelly Osbourne Doesn’t Have Friends

A photo of Kelly Osbourne

“I still find it tough to be around girls because I always say the wrong thing. If a friend asks me if I look fat in something, I’ll be honest and say ‘Yeah’ when she does.”

- Kelly Osbourne admits that she’s kind of a bitch.

This is a bitchy thing to do, right? If a friend is feeling all self conscious and does that admittedly annoying “do I look fat in this? Oh god, I’m so fat. Fat fat fat,” you say “no, honey, you don’t and you’re not,” or if she really doesn’t look as great as she could in her chosen ensemble, you say something like “you know what I think would look great? This other thing over here!” Your friends aren’t like Christina Aguilera, Kelly, you can’t even remotely get away with calling them fat bitches.

What do you think: is it no wonder that Kelly “finds it tough to be around girls,” or do Kelly’s friends need to toughen up?

12 CommentsLeave a comment

  • I’ve always sort of rooted for her but her obsession with fat and fatness and fat people is starting to make me like her less

  • Everyone was obsessed w/ Kelly’s fat for years. Now that she looks fabulous, I do think she’s entitled to be a tad bitter about all of it. And sorry – I am honest w/ my friends when they ask me how they look in something. I’d want that same honesty back! A real friend would be honest!

  • Honestly, I never think that her weight was the problem, but the shape of her face (and her blonde hair doesn’t help the cause). In fact, she looks weirder thin. I wonder if one of her friend would say she has an ugly face, how she would react, honesty or not.

  • “Attacking femaleness, deriding ‘girly stuff’ and rolling your eyes at ‘women’s issues,’ declaring yourself a ‘tomboy’ who gets along better with men because women are silly or pretty or whatever—these are expressions of internalised sexism. If that’s the way you feel about your own sex you’ll be doomed to feel inferior no matter what you achieve in life.”

    —Emily Maguire, Introduction to Female Chauvinist Pigs: Women and the Rise of Raunch Culture

    I admit I was terrified of girls when I was a youngster, because girls have a very different way of interacting and/or being mean. But I was also alienated and, uh, pretty badly socialized. I’m glad that when I came home shrieking that I needed to be pulled out of public school, my mom just ignored me.

    And that’s why anything resembling “Boo-hoo, I can’t make friends with other girls” really nerves me. Yes, you can, Kelly! Yes, you can. It’s, like, an important part of growing up.

    • holy shite i gotta check that book out! this subject intrigues me to no end, being a tomboy type girl who just ADORES my girly girlfriends. i too have come across pro-male chicks who brag about how they’ve always only had dude friends and…dang, that’s not really something to brag about! thanks for the book recommendation & the wise words, miss jenn.

  • Thanks for that insight Jenn. You are SO right.

    But what about just showing a little tact? Don’t tell someone they look fat, just tell them that the outfit isn’t flattering to them, and help them look for something better.

    I too was terrified of girls growing up. I was really shy and the energy of some girls, especially in adolescence, can be really intimidating.

    Of course people who puff themselves to appear tough are usually quaking with fear inside.

  • I’m not saying she is, because I don’t know her, but women who don’t have ANY female friends usually don’t because they are major skanks.

  • The reason she doesn’t have any friends is because she is as nasty as her mother. Who is she to criticise other females when she has an oddly shaped head, for a start. Then there are the ugly tattoos. It doesn’t matter how much weight Kelly loses or how long she maintains her new ‘body’. She will always be unattractive.

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